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The Daddies, 2016, acrylic on canvas

Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience, A project by Kent Monkman

The Daddies, 2016, acrylic on canvas
Kent Monkman’s Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience was created as a response to Canada 150 sesquicentennial celebrations. Monkman’s gender bending, time travelling alter-ego, Miss Chief Eagle Testickle is the guide on a journey through Canada’s history that starts in the present and takes us back to the years around Confederation.
Donald R. Sobey Foundation
The Scream, 2017, acrylic on canvas

Kent Monkman’s new, large scale project takes the viewer on a journey through Canada’s history that starts in the present and takes us back to a hundred and fifty years before Confederation. With its entry points in the harsh urban environment of Winnipeg’s north end, and contemporary life on the reserve, the exhibition takes us all the way back to the period of New France and the fur trade. The Rococo masterpiece The Swing by Jean-Honoré Fragonard is reinterpreted as an installation with Monkman’s alter ego, Miss Chief Eagle Testickle, in a beaver trimmed baroque dress, swinging back and forth between the Generals Wolfe and Montcalm. As both artist and curator, Kent Monkman’s first major solo-exhibition at the Art Museum at the University of Toronto includes his own paintings, drawings and sculptural works, in dialogue with historical artefacts and art works borrowed from museum and private collections from across the country. The exhibition narrates a story of Canada through the lens of First Nations’ resilience.

Kent Monkman Brochure

Celebrated for his unorthodox approach to history—entailing humour, parody and artistic fiction—Monkman’s project takes aim at stereotypes perpetuated in popular culture, high art, and spectacle: heteronormativity unravels in polysexual desire; colonial empire is upended in post-colonial counter-narratives; and the historical form of the museum diorama—the kind popularized by museums of Natural History, often featuring frozen moments of Aboriginal life in terms of a “vanished race”—is turned inside out. With a focus on his new paintings and drawings, Monkman’s visceral and moving exhibition provides a searing critique of Canada’s colonial policies in response to celebrations of Canada’s 150th birthday. As Monkman explains, “The last 150 years—the period of Modernity—represents the most devastating period for First Peoples, including the signing of the numbered treaties, the reserve system, genocidal policies of the residential schools, mass incarceration and urban squalor.”

The exhibition was produced by the Art Museum at the University of Toronto in partnership with the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, and has been made possible in part by the Government of Canada and the Ontario Arts Council. Lead Sponsor: Donald R. Sobey Foundation.

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HOURS OF OPERATION

Building Hours

Monday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday – 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday – 8:00 AM – 8:30 PM

Art Gallery

Daily 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Box Office

Monday to Saturday 9:00 AM – 8:00 PM, Closed Sunday
Please call 1-800-565-0278 or 902-566-1267 for information.

The Story of Confederation

June
Mon-Sat: 10am-3pm

July-August
Mon-Sat: 9am-5pm
Sun: 12-5pm

September
Mon-Sat: 10am-3pm


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HOURS OF OPERATION

Building Hours

8am – 6pm, Monday – Sunday

Art Gallery

10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Daily

Box Office

9 a.m – 8 p.m. Monday – Saturday
Please call 1-800-565-0278 or 902-566-1267 for information.

The Story of Confederation 

June
Mon-Sat: 10am-3pm

July- August
Mon-Sat: 9am-5pm
Sun: 12-5pm

September
Mon-Sat: 10am-3pm


What are Relaxed Performances?

 

Sometimes referred to as sensory-friendly experiences, Relaxed Performances give the opportunity for those with various sensitivities towards sensory stimuli to experience and enjoy live theatre.

These performances will be designed in a way to be more comfortable for audience members who may experience anxiety or are not comfortable with some aspects of a traditional theatre setting. This can include people on the Autism Spectrum and their families; those with sensory and communicative disorders or learning disabilities; people with Tourette’s syndrome; someone who might need to move often due to chronic pain or to use the facilities; or even parents with toddlers.

 

Relaxed Performances offered during the 2021 Charlottetown Festival:
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